Ten Reasons Your Branding is No Good

In Business, Design, Tips

Your brand is no good if:

  1. You have no colors or fonts associated with your business: Yes, it’s important that your logo can be printed and read in black and white.  No, you should not just use plain black text as a logo.
  2. You don’t have a website: It’s 2010 – if you don’t have a website, you’re missing out on huge numbers of potential clients and customers.  Websites provide a dynamic means of informing, involving, and communicating with your customers… not to mention a fantastic return on your investment if it’s created and maintained in the proper way.
  3. Your colors, logo, fonts, and ‘feel’ aren’t maintained throughout all of your promotional materials: You should be using the same look on your website, business cards, letterhead, envelopes, fliers, postcards, etc.  When a new lead refers to that business card you handed her, she should instantly recognize the postcard you sent a couple of weeks ago, your business’ website, and (because you’ll land that deal with all of this good branding) the invoice you’ll send out.
  4. Your logo designer didn’t give you either the vector files or multiple file sizes of your newly designed logo: Whether it’s on your website, your business cards, or a newsletter, your logo should always appear crisp and clear.  If you don’t have the vector files or multiple file sizes of your logo, talk to your designer ASAP–these files will prevent you from having to resize (and subsequently distort) your logo.
  5. You’re not using a custom background on Twitter or a custom tab on your Facebook page: Take advantage of the fact that Twitter allows you to use a custom background for your business’ profile and Facebook lets you create a custom tab on your business’ Facebook page.  Talk to your designer and have them create a Twitter background with your business’ contact information on it and a Facebook tab that includes special information, details, and messages.
  6. Your logo looks like another company’s logo: This one is fairly self explanatory — use your logo to your advantage… If you can create a lasting impression in potential clients and customers when they see your logo, there’s a better chance they’ll be more open to talking with you the next time they see your logo or branding (whether that be on a social networking site, your brick and mortar location, or your website).
  7. Your colors clash: If your colors are Christmas red and green, royal blue and red, magenta and and orange, etc., rethink your color strategy.  If no one can read the name of your business, how likely are they to remember it?
  8. Your colors are not industry-appropriate: Medical websites use blue, toy websites use primary colors, artists’ websites use black and white.  Your designers should know the effects that certain colors have on buyers (because they do.  See: http://blog.kissmetrics.com/color-psychology/)
  9. Your branding looks outdated: You don’t need to completely rebrand your business every ten years (in fact, you shouldn’t!) but you do need to ‘revamp’ it a bit every now and then.  Just like Jack in the Box, UPS, and Pepsi realized (see: http://designreviver.com/inspiration/20-great-and-20-not-so-great-logo-redesigns/), times change and so should your brand.
  10. You have a business but you don’t actually have a brand: You don’t need to spend outrageous amounts of money or invest large amounts of time into coming up with good branding.  Ask yourself what type of ‘persona’ or ‘mood’ your business has and what types of colors and emotions are typical in your industry – then go to your designer and talk about taking the first steps to developing your brand.  Spread your new brand throughout your website, business cards, office walls, and pamphlets.
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